A Gardener’s Guide: Reviewing 10 Best Composters For The Buck Today

Wondering where you went wrong with you wilted vegetables and flowers? Well, you would be surprised what a little compost love and a lot of patience would do.

​Ever peeked at the lush greenery in your neighbor’s backyard vegetable garden and wondered how they achieved that?

Well, the truth may shock you. It does not require lots of money, but you will need to give time and show love to your little garden.

The results? The effort will be worth it.

Last update on 2017-08-17 at 17:09 PST - Details

Contents

Comparing 10 Of The Best Composters On The Market

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Composter

Name

Capacity

Type

Material

Get IT Here

Yimby Tumbler Composter

37 Gallons

Tumbler

Recycled Plastic and recycled stee

Good Ideas CW-2X Compost Wizard Dueling Tumbler

50 gallons (2 chambers)

Tumbler

Recycled, BPA-Free Polyethylene

Editor's choice

Jora 70 Gallon 270 Compost Tumble

70 gallons

Tumbler

Galvanized Sheet Metal

Lifetime 60058 Compost Tumbler

80 gallons

Tumbler

Polyethylene (HDPE) Plastic and steel

Good Ideas CW-2X12 Senior Wizard Dual

80 gallons

Tumbler (dual chambers)

Recycled Plastic

Beautiful Composter

35 Gallons

Tumbler

Recycled Plastic

HOT FROG Dual Body Tumbling Composter

37 gallons

Tumbler

Recycled polyethylene

Spin Bin Composter

60 Gallon

Bin

Recycled Plastic

Premium Quality Stainless Steel Compost

1.3 Gallon

Bin

Stainless Steel

Redmon Green Culture

65 Gallons

Bin

Recycled Plastic

Before we get deeper into these best composter reviews, let’s demystify the words.

What is Composting?

Everyone has been talking about going green and only looking at the organic section of the grocery store. Well, compositing is the process of making your own manure from the waste in your kitchen. The decaying vegetables, potato peels and all that will make the ideal fertilizer for your garden.The resulting compost is chemical-free, and so your food will be super healthy. And it gets better; you save lots of money from growing your food this way.

#1 - Yimby Tumbler Composter  (Best Belling Composter – Best Value for money)

This composter is so popular with users such that it’s the best seller on Amazon. On the other hand it’s also quite heavy. It weighs well over 80lbs making it difficult to move from around.

This 37-gallon tumbler is a favorite for several reasons. Apart from being two chambered, it’s quite reasonably priced. The steel frame holds the bin in place so that it does not tip over when you fill it. Does it allow for turning? Yes, once you have filled it to its capacity, you can turn it around occasionally just to ensure that the compost cooks ideally.

Dual chambers allow you to make different batches of compost at various intervals. Once you put your organic waste in it, you can mark with the red indicator to make it known that the compost I cooking. Turn it 5 to 6 times a day after about 3 days of filling the tumbler.

How long does it take to compost? Two weeks is the period given by the manufacturer, but its dependent on the weather. The HDPE technology in the material makes that possible by retaining the heat at an optimal balance and hence speeding up the process. It has adjustable air vents for aeration, as the process will also need some air.

Last update on 2017-08-17 at 14:28 PST - Details

This composter does not come with a base to collect the compost tea that drips off it, but you can always improvise or place it in the garden. The door is a breeze to use. It does not open out, but instead, it slides. The one downside to this is that it may freeze during winter, making it hard to add content to your composter until it warms up.

While this asset works ideally, it is ideal for those who need a lot of compost. You can imagine rotating it when it only has a handful of content. In winter, things will certainly become much slower, and the compost will come out the same even after a month, but the process will get going when it heats up.

The body is made of BPA-free recycled polypropylene, and the frame is steel. Both these materials are durable.

What we like:

  • Solid construction.
  • Aeration helps with speeding up the process.
  • Dual chambers allow for mare compost.

    What we don't like:

    • The frame is quite heavy, and so it makes the entire unit slightly bulky.
    • It takes time to put it together.

    #2 - Good Ideas CW-2X Compost Wizard Dueling Tumbler - Most Sturdy Construction

    This composter comes fully assembled, which is a relief to many, but it lacks a frame to hold it in place. It has a broad base that works just as well, but a frame would elevate it.

    Most composters are not easy to assemble, and that’s why it’s such a relief that Good Ides sends this fully assembled. It measures 25 x 25.5 x 31 and weighs less that 30lbs, which makes it quite easy to handle and maneuver. What is it made of? Fully recycled and heavy plastic that will last you for ages.

    Each of the two chambers has an 8-inch opening that makes for easy filling. The base, which is broad and accommodating, catches all the ‘compost tea’ that drips during the process. It has a 5-gallon capacity, which is more than enough for 50 gallons that fill this composter. The lids also prevent rodents from getting into the composter.

    We’ve noted it’s made of hard plastic, and so the black color speeds up the process by absorbing and retaining heat. How long does it take to cook the material? Well, that’s dependent on the weather, but two weeks are enough when it is sunny. The small vents on the composter allow air in that ensures compost cooks well.

    Can you rotate it? Yes, since the base is wide and cut on both sides to allow the composter to lie and move correctly. However, it’s not as easy as giving a frame. The upside to this is the reduced weight that accompanies a steel frame. You will have to contend with having it lie close to the floor where it can be disturbed by raccoons, but then again the lid secures it tightly to prevent it from tampering.

    The body of this composter has deep handles that make rotation easy. They also act well when you want to transfer the contents after it’s done cooking. Double chambers will always make it possible to have two different batches cooking at the same time, which gives you enough for planting and mulching. While the composter does not have an indicator, you can always improvise so that you keep tabs on which chamber is cooking.

    What we like:

    • It has 18-unch lids that keep rodents out and organic matter well secured.
    • The construction is sturdy, and so is the material.
    • It has a large capacity.

      What we don't like:

      • It has no frame.
      • The vents could be larger to prevent compost from stinking so much.

      #3 - Jora 70 Gallon 270 Compost Tumbler - Most Sturdy Construction

      Although this composter has a sturdy construction and the material is excellent, the price is a bit steep.

      The Jora 70 Gallon is made of galvanized metal, which endures and makes for great compost maturity. It has two chambers so that you can cook and cure your kitchen waste at the same time. Since the material is insulated, it absorbs and retains heat (keeps heat up to 160 degrees F), to help the waste cook fast and evenly.

      This composter stands on a frame, which in itself keeps rodents and raccoons out of the way. Although the frame adds to the weight of this tumbler, you will not have to worry seeing that you will hardly need to move it after you have placed it strategically. It has handles on the side that makes it easy to rotate to ensure even cooking of the content.

      It has two doors to the 8-inch opening that allow you to feed your content easily. These doors open upwards to prevent any chance of freezing during the cold days. The material has been treated to withstand harsh elements, and so you can leave it out during winter even though not much will be happening.Compost cooking relies heavily on the weather, which is why hot seasons churn compost relatively fast. Luckily, no much planting or mulching is going on during winter either.

      Last update on 2017-08-17 at 17:09 PST - Details

      The Jora Tumbler measures 44 x 28 x 52 inches, weighs about 50lbs, and has a 70-gallon capacity, which translates to a lot of compost. This composter is ideal for those who have enough space for its footprint, and also in need of a lot of compost.

      When it is time to transfer content from the composter to say a wheelbarrow, the clearance between the tumbler and the ground is about 24 inches. That’s Plenty of space. Given that it is insulated, you may want to place it under the shade during summer because direct sun would provide too much heat inside. During winters when it’s all gloom, you can try the hot bottle trick (placing a bottle filled with steaming water in the composter. It will help move the process along, even though the action will still be pretty slow until it warms up.

      What we like:

      • Insulated and so it absorbs all the heat it gets.
      • The material is durable and BPA-free.
      • Smooth rotation thanks to the handles.

        What we don't like:

        • Expensive.

        #4 - Lifetime 60058 Compost Tumbler-Best For Heat Retention

        Even though this tumbler is made of durable material that absorbs heat, its odd shape makes it a bit tricky to rotate especially when you fill it to the brim.

        It is made of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) plastic, which is not only durable but also ideal for heat absorption. The powder-coated steel frame that holds it in place makes it easy to rotate the tumbler a few times in a week.

        This heavy material is not only durable, but is also recycled, a win to nature. It has an impressive capacity, 80 gallons, which would make do for a medium-sized piece of property. If you had a large tract of land, it would be better economically to bore a compost hole, which will handle way more than this tumbler’s capacity.

        The panels are double-walled to make for easy and fast heat absorption and retention. Although it isn’t insulated on the inside, the thick walls still make heat retention an easy feat. It has an internal bar that mixes and aerates the compost, making the decomposition process even and faster. This bar takes the place of the regular vents you would see on the body of a tumbler. You can expect the usual stink as organisms work through the pile, but it is all within control.

        The distance from the ground, you may be interested in that. It is about 26 inches, which makes it easy to transfer the compost from the tumbler to the wheelbarrow. The pin in the middle makes rotation manageable, even though it can be a tad heavy when you fill it (considering its size).

        Now the major downside: it comes unassembled, and it is not easy to put together. It takes a handy person to figure it out, seeing as the manual is not very helpful. The upside is that this is a one-off job. Once it has been put together, you will never have to repeat it.

        The height keeps animals away. The feeder hole locks completely to prevent any leakages and to block entry of rodents. The height also makes it pretty easy to load, and you will not need to bend. It is quite heavy, at 55lbs, but that is thanks to the durable material.

        What we like:

        • Locks well to keep rodents away.
        • The bar in the middle makes for perfect aeration and even cooking of compost.
        • It has a large capacity.

          What we don't like:

          • Assembly is a pain.
          • It is heavy to rotate when filled.

          #5 Good Ideas CW-2X12 Senior Wizard-Dual Tumbler Compost Bin - Best Compost Bin For Large Kitchens

          If you are always eating organic meals, you will have enough compost to fill this tumbler. The only problem is that the ventilation could be better.

          The capacity on this baby is quite something: 40 gallons on each side of the two chambers. If you live alone, you may have a hard time filling this up and even harder to rotate. It is made of recycled plastic, which makes it perfect for durability (and the environment), but it’s quite heavy on the hand. Luckily, the deep handles on the body make it a little easier.

          This composter comes fully assembled, saving you the trouble. It also comes with a deep tray that holds up to 5 gallons of compost tea, which you can use later. It should be placed on the ground, but you can prop it up to keep the raccoon away, although they would do no harm, as it is too heavy to move. The only other concern with it being on the ground is health-based, seeing as not everyone is comfortable or fit enough to bend over to fill it up every time.

          How much compost can it hold at once? We noted 80 gallons for both chambers, but you can make it a little light so that it rotates smoothly. It has little vents on both sides to let in air for the composting process. Some customers wish that the vents were larger to keep out the stink.

          Last update on 2017-08-17 at 15:38 PST - Details

          Now, which is the best position to keep it? The manufacturer advises to protect it from direct sunlight during summer, as that would bake the content. During spring, you can expose it to as much sunlight as Mother Nature is willing to give, but winters will be no-action months.

          Why keep it under the shade? Well, seeing as the material is double-walled, direct sun would lead to absorption of too much heat. Although that would speed up the process, it would not give the best results. During summer, you can have perfectly cooked manure in only 2 weeks.

          Each chamber is about 5.5 cubic feet to make 11 in total. Although this tumbler is not the cheapest, it sure is worth its cost, especially seeing that it is low maintenance.

          What we like:

          • It makes tea, which collects at the bottom.
          • It has a large capacity.
          • The material is durable and made to retain heat for quick processing.
          • It comes fully assembled.

            What we don't like:

            • Low, so you will have to bend to feed content into it.
            • It lies on the ground, which makes it vulnerable.

            #6 - Envirocycle Composter – Best Composter For Collecting Compost Tea.

            This tumbler makes you some compost tea. Unfortunately, it only has one chamber, and the base does not hold it so well and so you will have a little trouble rotating it.

            Most compost users will tell you that they like collecting tea as it is great for plants, but not every composter will allow you to do that. The Envirocycle Composter has a base that not only holds it in place but one that also collects tea from your organics. It goes through some tiny holes on the composter and then into the base where you can hose o your plants later.

            This tumbler is heavy, and it is made of recycled plastic that is quite sturdy. You will also like the fact that the plastic is BPA-free and FDA approved, and so it’s clean to be used on food. You may have a problem with the tumbler being on the ground, seeing that you will need to bend over to feed it. Well, you can always have an alternative place to lift it up to the height you want.

            Worried about wildlife disturbing your organics before they are cooked? The latch on this tumbler is as stable as they come to keep it tight and far from reach. The overall construction feels as sturdy as a tank, but rotating it is not as easy as you would wish. This tumbler takes in 35 gallons, and so you can imagine how heavy it can get when it is full. As much as it has handles on the body to make rotation easy, it still needs a little effort.

            The one thing that makes it a whole lot attractive is that fact that it does not need any assembly; it’s fully assembled from the manufacturer. Unfortunately, it has a single chamber, and so you can only make one batch of fertilizer at a go.

            The time it takes for compost to cook thoroughly depends on the weather. Certainly, things do happen faster during summer, and very slowly when it’s freezing. On days when the weather is 65 degrees F, the organics will decompose in a matter of days. Other times, it takes on average 6-8 weeks for compost to be perfect for use.

            What we like:

            • It is made of heavy material that absorbs and retains heat.
            • It comes fully assembled.
            • It separates compost tea.

              What we don't like:

              • It is one-chambered.
              • It is quite heavy when full, and so it becomes hard to rotate.

              #7 - HOT FROG Dual Body Tumbling Composter-Best Composter For Small Spaces

              Although the construction is beautiful and solid, this tumbler is a bit too expensive for its size.

              Digging through your compost to mix it up is not only nauseating, but it is also not as effective as turning it around. This tumbler makes that possible, seeing as it is hoisted on a sturdy steel frame. The deep fins on the body of the tumbler are well placed on several parts to make rotating an ever-easy job.

              This composter is made of recycled polyethylene, and it has two chambers that will both accommodate 37 gallons of content. While we can agree it’s quite small and so suited for a smaller farmer, the separation of the chambers makes it attractive in that you can have two batches of compost being ready for the planting season at different times.

              The BPA-free material is safe for your food, and it will not degrade under direct sunlight. It is black and heavy, two qualities that you’ll need in a sun-absorbing and heat-retaining tumbler. It isn’t insulated, and so direct sunlight will not affect the contents. Incorporate the fins on the surface of this composter and you will have enough oxygen getting inside the tumbler to bring the hot air ton comfortable level for even decomposing.

              Unfortunately, this tumbler does not make compost tea. It has no place for it to drain unless you improvise. The steel frame is powder -coated to keep it safe from the elements. The elevation is beneficial in two ways; one, who needs to worry about raccoons all the time? Two, those with joint problems will not need to bend over to feed content into the composter.

              Last update on 2017-08-17 at 15:20 PST - Details

              The distance from the ground to the tumbler is 18 inches, which will hinder you from pouring it directly into a wheelbarrow. You may need an extra hand for this.

              Let’s talk about the doors on each of the chambers. They are solid and made from the same material as the rest of the tumbler. They open and shut through sliding, and the latch is super effective to keep raccoons and other wildlife from getting to the content.

              The manufacturer says it takes two weeks to make perfect compost, but we rather think it depends on the weather. Hot summers could get you some compost in three weeks, but colder seasons will certainly take a lot longer.

              What we like:

              • The doors slide smoothly and lock correctly.
              • The recycled BPA-free plastic is solid.
              • The elevation gives it an upper hand.

                What we don't like:

                • It is too expensive for its size.
                • Too small for a sizable garden.

                #8 - Spin Bin Composter 60 Gallon Compost Tumbler-Member approved by the National Home Gardening Club

                The design o this tumbler is simple and unique. However, you may find that your content does not mix as well as it would in a tumbler that rotates round.

                The manufacturer was very particular when they made this bin. It has 20 ventilations slots and a bar in the intersection for proper aeration.

                Looking at its make, it looks more like a bin than a tumbler. It is all black almost 4 inches tall, allowing you to feed it without breaking your back. It is made of BPA-free recycled plastic, and the legs are made of steel. The frame suspends it in the air to make rotation an easy process.

                Usually, it is recommended to rotate 5-6 times every two or three days and especially when the weather is great. In the middle, this tumbler has a double bar that allows proper aeration. That, as well as your 20 slots, makes daily ventilation a breeze. Compost cooks better when air gets in frequently.

                Last update on 2017-08-17 at 16:19 PST - Details

                This tumbler is quite large from the looks, and that is okay because it holds up to 60 gallons of content. Now, with that weight and the heavy plastic material that makes it, you can imagine that it isn’t very easy to rotate. It does not have a bar designated for rotation, and you will need to hold onto the slits and spin it. When full, it may require two people to make this happen.

                A major upside is the fact that the material is durable and BPA-free. It is also easy to assemble especially when you use the explanatory manual that comes with it. It has two openings so that you can add scraps from whichever end you prefer. Both have solid lids that keep animals away and content safe.

                This large bin has four thermometer spots so that you can place it in and check the temperature without dipping in your hands. The black, sturdy exterior absorbs light and retains heat to speed up the process. It can take the heat, so putting it under direct sunlight will not cause degradation.

                What we like:

                • It is uniquely designed with 20 ventilation slots.
                • The thermometer slots allow for easy checking of the heat.
                • Lids keep it perfectly locked and the contents safe.
                • You can feed content from any end.

                  What we don't like:

                  • It’s heavy to rotate, especially when fully loaded.
                  • You would need to spin it several times to mix the content ideally.

                  #9 - Premium Quality Stainless Steel Compost Bin-Best Composter Bin For The Money

                  This bin is made of steel ad has several holes for aeration. Unfortunately, you will have to turn the content manually as it does not spin like a tumbler.

                  Not everyone needs a huge bin or composter for their kitchen garden. If you live alone and have no much kitchen scraps, you will not need a 60-gallon tumbler. Also, this is the ideal size for those with small gardens that will not need all that compost.

                  This bin looks humble to the onlooker, but it does a great job converting scrap into compost. It is made of stainless steel to last until you get bored of it or move to a house with a bigger garden. The material does not chip or crack, and it also acts as a good heat absorber.

                  Because stainless steel can handle water, you can wash this bin regularly to avoid build-up without worrying about rust. It has a sturdy handle made of the same material as the rest of the bin. What’s creative about it? It has charcoal filters at the bottom, which keep the odor away.

                  Last update on 2017-08-17 at 18:49 PST - Details

                  The vents on the lid not only keep the smell out, but they also help with the process. The one downside of this bin is that an animal can open the lid if you do not secure it tightly. It could also help placing the bin off the ground.

                  It measures 12.5 x 8 x 8 inches and weighs 2lbs, which you’ll admit is not much. It’s appealing too, and so you will not have to hide it out of site under the sink. With charcoal filters to get rid of the smell, your kitchen stays fresh even with a bin full of decomposing kitchen scraps.

                  This stainless bin is one of the cheapest you will find on the market. It also comes fully assembled, and so no skills are required on your end. What of its longevity? Stainless steel lasts forever! Its dishwasher safe, but the seams cannot take all that rattling. You'd be safer hand washing it.

                  What we like:

                  • It is cheap.
                  • It is small for those with small gardens.
                  • Charcoal filters keep the odor off.

                    What we don't like:

                    • The lid can give way.
                    • It is too light and hence easy to knock off.

                    #10 Redmon Green Culture 65-Gallon Compost Bin-The Bin With The Nest Ventilation

                    It has four doors for easy access, and it has a large capacity, but it can get too heavy for rotating and emptying.

                    One thing sure about this bin; it isn’t a looker, but then again we are not in it for the looks, are we? This bin is large, and you will get that from looking at it. It also has large capacity-65 gallons. That’s no joke.

                    This bin is made of thick weather-resistant plastic resin, and it weighs 15lbs before you load it. It measures 30.75 inches tall and 26 inches wide. Well, this bin has a large footprint and so only ideal for those who can spare some space.The four doors are situated at the bottom for easy removal of compost. The bottom is open to facilitate entry of worms, and there are sturdy legs to keep the bin grounded. The entire body has sizeable ventilation holes to ensure proper aeration. It also has a lid at the top to keep everything safe from all disturbances.

                    The shape of the bin is such a way that it cannot be tipped off easily. The top is way narrower than the bottom to keep it balanced and secure. Add its reasonable weight (15lbs), and you can be sure animals would have a hard time tipping it off to the ground.

                    Last update on 2017-08-17 at 19:22 PST - Details

                    It is all weather, and so the sun does not deter it. To speed up the process during summer, place it where it will get the best access to the sun. The 12-inch doors open out, so winter will not freeze them over. Seeing as the material absorbs heat so well, it will churn perfect compost in about 4 weeks during summer. The winters are not well yielding, unfortunately.

                    This bin does not have an aeration bar sadly, but that happens with all bins. When you need to turn everything around, you will need to do that manually with a farm fork. The vents make it easy though, and so does the opening at the bottom.

                    The unit is easy to put together. It literally takes minutes. Although it is sturdy, you would need to place a rock or something equally heavy on top of it to secure it if you live in windy areas.

                    What we like:

                    • Simple construction and design.
                    • Easy to assemble.Cheap but durable.
                    • The resin plastic is BPA-free.

                      What we don't like:

                      • Manual turning of compost.
                      • Needs reinforcement if you live in windy areas.

                      What Should You Look Out For When Buying A Composter?

                      How much does it cost? That’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of spending money on anything.

                      How much compost can it hold? However, when it comes to the best composter, that factor has to play second fiddle.

                      Primarily, we have two types of composters.

                      Continuous Bins

                      You know how you want to add kitchen scraps to your bin every day continuously?

                      This is the kind that you get. It gets its name from this little fact: that you can add more stuff each day into it as you wait for it to decompose beautifully.

                      It comes with a solid lid that shuts rodents out and them the done compost will slide to the bottom of the pile. It works slowly, and it is ideal for those gardeners who are in no hurry for compost.

                      Batch Composters (Tumblers)

                      Unlike continuous bins, batch composters take one large batch and cook it until it is done. They also have a large capacity and are made of heavy material. It could be resin plastic or steel, but it has to be thick enough to retain heat and absorbent enough too, as those are two primary qualities that speed up compost production.

                      Unlike bins, tumblers have the ‘tumble’ ability as their name suggest. They are easy to spin around to enable the process. Usually, you are advised to turn the content every 2-3 days, at least 5 times each day. They also have an aeration bar that helps circulate oxygen.

                      Tumblers are a bit tricky to select as they come in various shapes and designs. You will have those suspended in the air with steel frames, and there are the rolling drums that lie on the ground, held by some base.

                      Undoubtedly, the frame hoisted kind are more liked for the fact that they are easy to feed (no breaking backs when bending over), and notorious raccoons do not touch them. What’s more, the drums are easy to empty, as you will only need to roll it over to the site where you need it.​

                      What Really Happens During Composting?

                      Now, the science behind this process involves microbes and bacteria. Bacteria get things started, and in the process, they create heat and carbon dioxide. Compost gets hot, actually uncomfortably hot to about 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 degrees Celsius) as it brews. Worms, insects, slugs and other microorganisms join the party, and they start eating the rotting particles. Their poop helps create compost.​

                      Balancing Carbon and Nitrogen

                      Different plants will need of compost different kinds. Vegetables, for instance, need bacterial compost, which will start with a lower carbon to nitrogen ratio. This composition will come from 30% dry material such as straw, 45% green material, and 25% manure.

                      Trees, on the other side, will need fungal compost that will bear a higher carbon to nitrogen ratio. In this case, you will require more woody material, and so 45% of the base will be straw and other dry materials, while 30% will be made of green. Manure takes the other 25%.

                      Healthy compost will have the ideal balance of nitrogen and carbon. The rule here is to have more carbon than nitrogen. Why is that? Because carbon-based materials break down easily and speed the process up. Seeing as nitrogen contains green and heavy raw material, the bulk may lead to a smelly composition that takes ages to disintegrate finally.

                      Bottom-line: Too much carbon without enough nitrogen components and the pile will not have enough heat. Too much nitrogen and the pile will not be able to handle the heat. An ammonia stink will come out of it, signifying disaster. There has to be the perfect balance for compost to form.

                      • Carbon Components

                        Your carbon parts are any dry material. You have wood shavings, clippings, twigs, dried leaves and peels, egg shells, coffee filters, shredded paper and any other dry ingredient you can think of using, or you have in your kitchen. As you can see, they allow oxygen, thanks to their large particles, and so they speed up the process. Have them form the base to allow oxygen to reach far under the pile.
                      • Nitrogen Components

                        These are your everyday greenery, including peels, green leaves, green lawn clippings, kitchen scraps , coffee grounds, tea leaves, and the likes. They supply the enzymes that help break down the process.

                        No matter what you do, do not add bones into your compost. Citrus and lemon peels to do not belong in there as the acidity could kill worms.

                      Tea Anyone?

                      What is all that business about compost tea? You can brew the tea separately, but you can also collect it from your composter. Composters that have bases at the bottom will collect the liquid coming from underneath. Since the liquid has all the advantages of compost (microorganisms, they are oxygenated, and it has been brewing for a while), it’s like steroids for your plants.

                      What Do You Look For In A Composter?

                      Well, not too many things, actually.

                      Type

                      Do you want a tumbler or a bin? Composters have aeration bars (some of them), and they are easy to spin. Most of them are hoisted on frames, and so they are safe from rodents. Ensure that it locks tight to keep anything from getting in, and make sure that the material is thick enough to abs or and retain heat.

                      Bins are usually smaller (but not all of them), and they cater to the gardener with a small piece of land. If you go for a bin, make sure it has enough ventilation and charcoal filters to keep the odor away. The material also matters. Make it either sturdy plastic that can handle the elements or stainless steel.

                      Size

                      It will depend on the size of your garden. Small gardens don’t need a lot of manure, and so a 30-gallon bin or tumbler will do. You can even get a smaller one (5 gallons or so0n to fit under the sink. Larger gardens will call for 60-100-gallon tumblers (for the outdoors). If it’s going to be large, ensure that it has ample handles for effecting spinning. Better yet, get one with an aeration bar to keep the insides of the tumbler oxygenated.

                      Access Panels

                      The little doors on composters are essential for feeding content and drawing out the finished product. Ensure the door is large enough for comfortable use -8 to 12 inches is good. One more thing that will concern you is the latch on the door. You want it to be tight enough to keep off rodents and wild animals. The only things you want inside you composter are worms and other microbes.

                      Aeration Vents

                      These are crucial, as they will ensure a constant supply of oxygen, which is necessary for the process. Most bins will have vents on the lid, which tumblers could have on the body or the sides. Either way, you want it to have enough ventilation.

                      Finally, you can consider the price. As we always say, do not break the bank while looking for the most expensive compost bin or tumbler. This review has a variety of them, and they range from reasonable costs to the higher-end ones. As long as it meets all the requirements we have stated, it will do.

                      And The Best Composter Is…

                      All the 10 composters we have listed are ideal for any gardener, as we have carefully selected both the larger sizes and the smaller ones. Although we are bi-partisan, we think Jora 70 Gallon 270 Compost Tumbler is hands down one of the best composters there is on the market.

                      Let’s get this out first: this baby is expensive. It will set you back a pretty one, but then again it will serve you for long. Capacity: 70 gallons and it is made of galvanized metal. The inside is insulated to keep heat at the best temperatures, and also to take advantage of the least amount of sunlight.

                      Inclement weather does not deter this bad boy, and so direct sunlight or freezing conditions can bring it on. It has a large door to enable easy feeding, and it is raised from the ground so that you do not have to bend over while feeding it. Transfer of content is easy; just place a wheelbarrow underneath it and pour.

                      The color is appealing too, as are the two chambers. The entire tumbler is treated to prevent rusting.

                      Still looking through reviews on the best composters after reading this?

                      Amelia
                       

                      Amelia Robinson is a lover of plants and gardens, as well as an educator on this topic. It’s her goal to make sure that you get the chance to learn what you need to about gardening to succeed with your own home garden at the blog RobinsonLovePlants.com. You’re not going to find just a collection of basic articles about gardening here. Instead, she wants to answer the difficult questions for you. She tweets at @robinsonplants

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