5 Signs to Spot If Your Tree Is Going to fall

Trees have numerous benefits to the environment. One massive tree can increase your property value in addition to air conditioning. However, Falling trees can cause injuries, property damage, and even deaths.

Some of the main reason why tress falls includes insect infestation, poor soil condition, malnutrition, and improper planting condition.

While we can’t predict accurately when a tree will fall, you can spot some warning signs and act before it is too late. Luckily we have compiled some telltale signs you should know. Let’s get started.

1. A cavity in the trunk

A cavity inside the trunk usually forms as a result of shedding branches. Secondly, self-pruning does open wounds that can cause decay inside the tree. However, if there is enough solid wood around the wound, then you should not worry about the tree tipping over. It is shrewd to consult a professional to be on the safe side.

2. Deep Cracks or missing cracks in the Tree trunk

Missing barks on the tree trunk are enough causes for concern. First, you should have it examined by an arborist. The presence of cankers signifies that the tree is dying while deep cracks could make your tree considerably weak and unable to support its branches. As the tree becomes weak, there is a higher likelihood of falling.

3. Weak or decaying Roots

It is somehow tricky to spot weak or rotten trees since roots are covered in soil. However, it is an excellent method to determine if the tree is rotting from the inside. Fungi and mushroom growth is an indication of rooting wood. A tree with decaying roots is unstable and may fall anytime, especially if strong winds blow. If you notice your tree has weak or rotten roots, then you should consult a professional arborist. In case you leave around Atlanta and you feel something is amess with your trees, check out this affordable tree service in Atlanta.

4. Dead or falling branches

Although dead branches do not necessarily mean that your tree will fall, it is a signifying the current tree condition. This means that if you spot falling dead branches, then something is not right with your tree. Shedding is a way for the tree to make it smaller. It is also a self-pruning method.  Typically, this means that the tree is not getting enough nourishment or its suffering from insect infestation.

5. V-shaped branch growth

Tree branches should grow at an ideal distance to provide a perfect space for development.  U shape is proof of this strong union. However, if the branches grow tightly together, they often have a v shape. You can spot the v growth during winter or after falls when the tree sheds the leaves. The point is that tight branch growth is a bad sign.

6. Missing inside leaves

Trees should lose leaves from outside. If your tree loss leaves close to the trunk, then you should be concerned. This is because the root zone may have a problem. Remember that trees get water and nutrients from the root zone. With an unhealthy roots system, your tree may fall easily, and the first signs to see will be loss of leaves from the inside.

7. Leaning trunk

Is your tree leaning more than 15 degrees? If the answer is yes, then you should have it removed. If your tree is leaning too much due to roots problems or winds, then it is a telltale sign that it is going to fall. However, a tree that tilts naturally as it grows is not always a risk.

Conclusion

If you notice the signs above do on wait until it is too late. Seek professional help to determine the best course of action. A certified arborist will inspect and decide whether or not it is safe to keep the tree. They can also help with pruning if need be. Lastly, you may have to bring the tree down before it causes property destruction or hurt people.

Amelia
 

Amelia Robinson is a lover of plants and gardens, as well as an educator on this topic. It’s her goal to make sure that you get the chance to learn what you need to about gardening to succeed with your own home garden at the blog RobinsonLovePlants.com. You’re not going to find just a collection of basic articles about gardening here. Instead, she wants to answer the difficult questions for you. She tweets at @robinsonplants

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